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Neurocognitive outcome in young adults born late-preterm

AIM: This study examined whether late-preterm birth (34+0 to 36+6wks+d
gestational age) was associated with neurocognitive deficit in young adulthood,
and whether small for gestational age (SGA) birth amplified any adversity.
METHOD: Participants derived from the prospective regional cohort study, the Arvo
Ylppo Longitudinal Study (n=786; 398 females, 388 males) (mean age 25y 4mo, SD
8mo), born 1985 to 1986 late-preterm (n=119; 21 SGA, <-2 SD) and at term (37+0 to
41+6wks+d; n=667; 28 SGA) underwent tests of intelligence, executive functioning,
attention, and memory, and reported their education. RESULTS: Those born
late-preterm scored -3.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] -6.71 to -0.72) and -3.11
(95% CI -6.01 to -0.22) points lower on Full-scale and Verbal IQ than peers born
at term. Compared with those born at term and appropriate for gestational age
(>/=-2 to <2 SD) Full-scale, Verbal, and Performance IQ scores of those born
late-preterm and SGA were -9.45 to -11.84 points lower. After adjustments,
differences were rendered non-significant, except that scores in Full-scale and
Performance IQ remained lower among those born late-preterm and SGA.
INTERPRETATION: Late-preterm birth, per se, may not increase the risk of poorer
neurocognitive functioning in adulthood. But the double burden of being born
late-preterm and SGA seems to increase this risk. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:
Late-preterm birth did not increase the risk of poorer neurocognitive functioning
in adulthood. But the double burden of being born late-preterm and being small
for gestational age did increase this risk.
CI - (c) 2017 Mac Keith Press.

Langue : ANGLAIS

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